Aussies and the Giro d’Italia’s maglia rosa

With 13 Australian starters in the 97th Giro d’Italia there’s a big representation from a nation that, in 2014, is able to watch the race live on free-to-air television for the first time. SBS is broadcasting all the stages live and there’s much anticipation around the event that includes Cadel Evans in the line-up. He was the first Aussie to ever wear the maglia rosa (back in 2002, when he led GC for one stage and ultimately finished 14th overall). In 2010, as the world champion, he again wore the leader’s jersey for one day before finishing fifth overall (and winning the maglia rossa for first in the points classification).

Since the 17th stage of the 2002 race, five Australians have worn the maglia rosa – Evans as well as Brad McGee, Brett Lancaster, Robbie McEwen and Richie Porte. Of this quintet it is Porte, who won the white jersey in the 2010 edition as the race’s best young rider, spent the longest in the lead of GC. The Tasmanian wore pink for three days during his debut in the Giro. McGee wore pink for two days in 2004 and the others only spent one day each in the overall lead (with Evans doing that twice, 2002 and 2010).

With thanks to Yuzuru Sunada, here is a gallery of images of all the Australians who have led the Giro d’Italia until now.

 

The first maglia rosa for an Australian rider: Cadel Evans at the start of stage 17 in 2002.  Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

The first maglia rosa for an Australian rider: Cadel Evans at the start of stage 17 in 2002.
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

 

The winner of the prologue in the 2004, Bradley McGee. He spent two days in the maglia rosa that year... Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

The winner of the prologue in the 2004, Bradley McGee. He spent two days in the maglia rosa that year…
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

 

Brett Lancaster won the 1.15km prologue of the 2005 Giro d'Italia. He beat Matteo Tosatto by just one second to take the maglia rosa for a day. Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

Brett Lancaster won the 1.15km prologue of the 2005 Giro d’Italia. He beat Matteo Tosatto by just one second to take the maglia rosa for a day.
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

 

After winning stage two of the 2005 Giro, Robbie McEwen replaced his Australia champion's jersey with the maglia rosa... for just one day. Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

After winning stage two of the 2005 Giro, Robbie McEwen replaced his Australian champion’s jersey with the maglia rosa… for just one day.
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

 

After stage two of the 2010 race, when Cadel Evans was doing the Giro d'Italia in the hope that he could impress the Tour de France organisers enough for them to invite his BMC team to their race as a wildcard entrant, he put on the maglia rosa for a second time in his career. Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

After stage two of the 2010 race, when Cadel Evans was doing the Giro d’Italia in the hope that he could impress the Tour de France organisers enough for them to invite his BMC team to their race as a wildcard entrant, he put on the maglia rosa for a second time in his career.
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

 

Richie Porte has collected more pink jerseys from the Giro d'Italia than any other Australian. He spent three days in the lead of GC during his debut in the Italian race in 2010. Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

Richie Porte has collected more pink jerseys from the Giro d’Italia than any other Australian. He spent three days in the lead of GC during his debut in the Italian race in 2010.
Photo: Yuzuru Sunada

Author: rob@ride

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