Select Page

Paraphernalia: Friday favourites

Paraphernalia: Friday favourites

In each issue of RIDE there are a multitude of cycling products featured on our ‘Paraphernalia‘ pages. There’s considerable variety with a focus on new releases and/or products for the season of release. Once in a while there’s a coincidental glut of one type of product – like the influx of shoes we received a little while ago (for RIDE #66), or the collection of new wheels that you’ll see in the upcoming issue (RIDE #68). But our aim is for relevant reviews of equipment that we believe will entice you.

Jack Lynch is our man in the office who is responsible for much of the tech writing, as well as building our fleet of test bikes (and, at times, doing some modelling of clothing). As part of an online initiative between issues, he had decided to feature products from Paraphernalia each Friday… they may be from the archives or for a future issue but they amongst are favourite products.

The items you see below are this week’s selection of five favourites. We would also like to encourage reader feedback via social media and/or email. Please let us know what you like and what you’d like to see reviewed…

 

 

* * * * *

Oakley Jawbreaker: Uranium Collection Prizm (RIDE #68)

(Click the photo below to begin the slideshow.)

  • Oakley Jawbreaker. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Oakley Jawbreaker. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Oakley Jawbreaker. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Oakley Jawbreaker. Photo: RIDE Media

There is little reason why Oakley is the most prevalent eyewear brand in the peloton, it continually innovates and pushes boundaries – and more often than not succeed in extending limitations. The Jawbreakers are the first completely new design from Oakley in a while and past errors, however petty, seem to have been rectified.

Where the Racing Jacket model (previously Jawbone) failed cyclists was that there was a blind spot for some out when looking out of the corner of the eye. This could be dangerous when racing in a tight group or if performing a lazy head check. The Jawbreaker’s large lens eradicates this issue due to its sheer size. It is difficult to have a completely unimpeded view from full-framed glasses but these Jawbreakers come pretty close with the only hint of the frame showing where the arms join.

The black edging underneath the lens is clever as it kills the sun’s rays before they can sneak underneath into the rider’s eyes and upset them. This is particularly effective when riding directly into the bright morning or evening sun. The new ‘Prizm’ lens is extremely sharp in these scenarios too and eradicates most glare without compromising clarity.

‘Switchlock’ technology is carried into the Jawbreaker and, as always, makes changing lenses a breeze. Being able to separate the frame from lens also means all components can be cleaned thoroughly – an underrated feature.

A revived characteristic for Oakley is that the arms on the Jawbreaker have three different length adjust settings so they can fit most heads and cater for most helmet shapes. There are also plenty of lens vents so fogging up at the traffic lights is not a problem (neither is overheating which was an issue with the Eyeshades – an early Oakley model reminiscent of the Jawbreaker’s shape).

Oakleys tend to have a knack of fitting most head and brow shapes so, if you like the design and colour range it has to offer with the Jawbreaker, then you should definitely consider these shades.

 

Cost: AUD$310. Weight: 33g

 

* * * * *

Kinetic Rock and Roll 2.0, Road Machine 2.0 & extras (RIDE #67)

(Click the photo below to begin the slideshow.)

  • Kinetic home trainer. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Kinetic home trainer. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Kinetic home trainer. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Kinetic home trainer. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Kinetic home trainer. Photo: RIDE Media

 

Kinetic is staying out of the direct-drive indoor trainer market and sticking with the company’s strengths by continuing to use tyre-resistance technology. The Rock and Roll 2.0 is the pinnacle of Kinetic’s range. An axle-free flywheel gives the trainer a very realistic ‘spin down’ feel. ‘Rock and roll’ refers to the flexible frame that moves as you and your bike do. This is designed to further increase the realistic road feel and ensures that the rider ‘switches on’ their core muscles. More sedate trainers can promote poor technique by allowing smaller muscle groups to ‘switch off’, so the Rock and Roll 2.0 is a clever innovation. When combined with the Riser Ring Turntable (a block that rotates and slightly destabilises the front wheel when holding the handlebar), the stationary trainer becomes a full-body workout that is specific to cycling and will be advantageous to full cycling fitness when you hit the road.

The Road Machine 2.0 uses the same fluid resistance wheel as the Rock and Roll. It is less expensive as it does not give the same ‘outdoor cycling’ sensation without the flexible frame. All other features are the same however, so by altering Pro Flywheel resistance plates and using the aforementioned Riser Ring, a quality training session can still be achieved with this set-up.

The inRide Watt Meter is a simple way to further enhance an indoor training session. Firmware in the pod measures speed and cadence at the tyre which is translated into wattage through the magic of mathematics. The key to this is Kinetic’s unflinching belief that its trainers create perfectly smooth and even resistance. To display this data, an app must be downloaded onto your Apple or Android device.

 

Cost: AUD$999 (Rock and Roll 2.0), AUD$639 (Road Machine 2.0), AUD$100 (Trainer Bag), AUD$119 (Floor Mat), AUD$79 (Riser Ring Turntable), AUD$149 (Pro Flywheel 12lb), AUD$129 (inRIDE Watt Meter, Pod only), $219 (inRIDE Watt Meter, incl. HR strap)

 

* * * * * 

 

Shimano Sport Camera (RIDE #65)

(Click the photo below to begin the slideshow.)

  • Shimano Sports Camera. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Shimano Sports Camera. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Shimano Sports Camera. Photo: RIDE Media

  • Pro camera mounts. Photo: RIDE Media

 

You may have already seen video captured with Shimano’s new sport camera, with angles and sights and sounds from within Team Giant-Shimano’s sprint train in full flight. If you haven’t, it’s well worth a visit to the team’s website. These little cameras (along with GoPro and Garmin) are going to change bicycle race broadcasting for the better, and they’re fun and easy for punters to use as well.

One button turns the camera on, turns on the WiFi, and cycles through the various recording modes. One button starts and stops recording and turns the unit off. It’s light enough to not annoy while mounted to a helmet or a handlebar. It’s also waterproof to 10 metres, meaning there’s no need for a special case if rain is threatening or during bike wash time.

I wouldn’t call operation immediately intuitive, as you’ll need to read the quick start guide or watch the short instructional video to know what the various sounds and colour-coded lights actually mean, but within just a few minutes I was cycling through the ‘HD video’ and ‘still photo’ recording modes.

A free app is available (for Apple and Android) to help manage files and system settings via the camera’s in-built WiFi, and the app turns your phone into a live viewfinder. The camera also features ANT+ connectivity, allowing you to pull data for third party devices like power meters or GPS computers or Shimano’s own ‘D-Fly’ Di2 connection, which can then be added as a dashboard-style overlay while editing your videos. The mounting interface is the same as GoPro, meaning there’s already a wide range of accessory mounts catering to your many action sports needs.

It’s a small, light, and easy to use camera with excellent picture and sound quality. This is an impressive first offering by Shimano, as we can’t find any area where it doesn’t hold its own against the established players in this hyper-competitive market. Great stuff.

 

Cost: AUD$399

Weight: 86g (camera); 31g (helmet mount)

 

* * * * *

 

PRO Camera Mounts (RIDE #65)

Coinciding with the launch of Shimano’s sport camera, we received a range of new mounts from PRO. These sturdy CNC-machined brackets will keep your new camera securely mounted to your bike. The mounts work equally well with Shimano and GoPro cameras, which share the same bracket interface. The stem cap version gave us our favourite recording angle, though we needed to install a few extra stem spacers to lower the handlebar within the composition.

 

Cost: $40 (handlebar); $32 (saddle); $32 (stem cap)

Weight: 35g (handlebar); 50g (saddle); 22g (stem cap)

 

Sign up for RIDE News

RIDE Insta: @ridemediaHQ

  • Pt2 of a series. #teambikes @bahrain_merida @rideshimano @srmpower #bikes #ride #cycling #review #ridemedia
  • #team #bike @bahrain_merida @rideshimano #ride #cycling #review

Follow RIDE on Instagram

Month by Month (archives)

Keep up to date with RIDE

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from the world of RIDE.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This